Why Nomad? Because we have hope.

November 23, 2018

A few months ago, Threads by Nomad completed a rebranding of our logo, marketing materials and website. Our new logo, created by artist and graphic designer Chelsea Park-Brouse, includes a three-pronged swirl shape, an ancient symbol for "nomad."

I am often asked why our business is not called "Threads by Nomads" since there are two of us at the helm and the members of our team have all traveled from elsewhere. The truth is that our name is less literal than it is intended to be inclusive. Here's where I get all "woo-woo" on you.

 

Yes, of course, we were first attracted to the name because it captured who we are both personally and professionally. Our mission is inspired by decades of travel and living in other countries. But the name has come to symbolize so much more. A nomad is a member of a people having no permanent abode, who travel from place to place to find fresh pasture for their livestock. In short, a nomad is a person in search of pasture, "nomós." Nomós, the origin of the word nomad, is in fact the ancient Greek word for pasture. A pasture is a place of rest, restoration, and peace. A place where what we need to nourish us is plentiful and the abundance is to be shared.

 

Wherever you fall on the political spectrum, my guess is that you will agree that what we're doing right now isn't working. That our country and the world feel as if they are coming apart at the seams. (An appropriate metaphor, is it not?) But I cling to hope, hope that stems from the belief that we are all nomads, seeking pasture, rest, restoration and peace. In us and in the world.

 

This metaphorical pasture also applies to what we are trying to provide for our employees, by offering them financial security (as much as possible) in the form of paychecks and professional training, as well as personal security in the form of friendship. 

The application of "seeking pasture" stretches further when you understand that Mom and I also do this because it fills us, it restores us. Yes, owning a small business is stressful. No, social entrepreneurship is not easy. But in so many ways, running this business has brought us closer to the women we were made to become, the women we always were. (See? I told you I would get all "woo-woo" on you.)

 

The truth is that Nomad is us then and us now, it's the members of our team, and it's you. Because we are all nomads in search of pasture, beings in search of rest, beloveds in search of peace. And our desire is that Threads by Nomad contributes to this search through the sale of beautiful things and the support of the people who make them.

 

To remind us of this hope for pasture, and this commitment to seeking it for us and for others, we have collaborated with Ona Mission out of Haiti to bring our logo to life in the form of a Christmas tree ornament. Haitians have been making metal art out of used 55-gallon oil drums since the 1950s. They hand draw the design, hammer, and chisel each ornament. Ona Mission supports fair trade and strives to improve the livelihood of disadvantaged artisans across the globe. Partnering with them on this project just made sense. The ornaments measure 6-inches in diameter and sell for $12 apiece.

Whether you hang them on your tree, gift them to others this season, or purchase one to hang near your desk as a reminder to cling to hope, each ornament purchased between now and Cyber Monday will count as an entry in this giveaway. In fact, each item purchased (not just the ornaments) between now and Cyber Monday will count as an entry

 

MLK once said, "We must accept finite disappointment, but never lose infinite hope." The "nomad" in "Threads by Nomad" symbolizes this hope. Hope that if we seek rest, rest is what we will eventually find. Hope that if we seek peace, peace is waiting for us. Will you join us in hoping this holiday?

 

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